Bihac, a city on the Uni River, is located in the northwestern part of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The town lies in the vast Bihać basin, which is closed from the west and southwest by the Plješivica mountain and its slopes Debeljaca and Somišlje, while on the east and southeast it is bounded by the Grmeč mountain and its slopes Ljutoč, Jadovnik and Gredoviti vrh. Bihac has an elevation of 231 meters. Due to favorable geographical and climatic conditions, this area was inhabited in prehistoric times. This is confirmed by the archaeological research carried out. The results of these investigations are the discoveries at the Jezerine necropolis in Pritoci, at the Soja settlement in Ripč, at the Ribić necropolis and at the shrine of the Japod tribe at the source of Privilege. In addition to these discoveries, archaeologists also found in the vicinity of Bihac the remains of hillforts, settlements on elevated flattened heads (Izačić-gradina, Kulište near Bajrić).

At the entrance or in the immediate vicinity of the ruins, tumuluses or prehistoric graves (Palež near Spahić, Zapoljak-Crkvina near Tihotina and Dubrovnik near Srbljan) were noticeable. The largest number of fortifications in the Bihac area originated in the older Iron Age (8th - 9th century BC). In the early Iron Age (5th - 5th century BC), one of the centers of the Illyrian tribe of Japod was located in the vicinity of Bihac. They will be conquered by the Roman military leader Octavian in 35 BC. ) in the vicinity of Bihac was one of the centers of the Illyrian tribe Japod. They will be conquered by the Roman military leader Octavian in 35 BC. ) in the vicinity of Bihac was one of the centers of the Illyrian tribe Japod. They will be conquered by the Roman military leader Octavian in 35 BC.

The most significant monuments that Japodi left in the Bihac area were stone urns, made in the form of crates. In them the Japods put the ashes of their burnt dead. Urns were found at Humacka Glavica, in Čavkići, Golubić, Pritoci, Ribić, Ripč and Mali Založje. In addition to the drawings, the urns also contained Roman inscriptions, on the basis of which it was possible to find out the name of the deceased who was buried in them. Numerous tombstones, inscriptions, reliefs, consecrations to deities and remains of Roman buildings date from the Roman period. Thus, six Roman monuments were found in Golubić, which were used to cover the water supply in Žegar, while the remains of Roman buildings were found in Brekovica, Golubić, Ripč and Mali Založje. In Golubic, Mitras relief was found, two dedications to the god Mitras and one relief with the figure of Heracles. Significant archeological findings from the Roman period are Roman coins made of bronze and Japop inscriptions found in Brekovica, Čavkići, Ćehici, Humacka Glavica, Kralje, Pritoci, Ribić and Mali Založje. VII. The Slavs began inhabiting the area of ​​Bihac in the 20th century. According to historical sources, the first towns around the Una River were built in the mid-13th century.

As the most important medieval fortress of Pouni, Bihac was first mentioned in 1260 as the property of the citeritic Topuski Abbey. This is confirmed by the document of the Hungarian-Croatian King Bela IV. from 2/26/1260 granting the estate of Kralja to Topuska Abbey for the maintenance of the city on the island of Sv. Ladislava. In the preserved historical documents the town on the island is recorded under different names: Bihig, Byheg, Buch, Bichich, Bihag, Vyhych, Bywhergh Wyhugh, which signifies royal good. As early as 1262, Bihac became a free municipality with all the rights of a “free royal city”. This status enabled him to achieve much faster economic and transport development. There is insufficient information on the city's appearance in the 13th century. What we do know is that during that period, Bihac had seven churches, the largest of which was the city church of St. Antun. In this period, there are also references to Dominicans who had their own monastery near the city church (mentioned as early as 1266). Therefore, most historians consider the church of Sts. Anthony was their church. With the arrival of the Ottomans in 1592, this church was transformed into a mosque, called Fethiya (conquered). In addition to the Dominicans in the 14th century, the Franciscans who owned the church of St. Mary and her monastery. On the basis of later data, especially those of the 16th century, it is concluded that Bihac was built on an artificial island, surrounded by double ramparts with numerous loopholes with round and square towers. In addition, it had a domed roof that can be seen on the medieval coat of arms of the town of Bihac. The city was entered through three gates, the ones towards Izacic, Zavalje and Uni. Thanks to one verbatim document from the end of 14. century, we learn that the seal of the medieval Bihac is made up of three towers, with a middle tower that had a flag. The same motif had the medieval coat of arms of the town of Bihać.
At the beginning of the 15th century, Bihac lost its self-government. In his area during this period are the crews of Hrvoje Vukčić, the governor of Ladislav Naples, pretender to the Croatian-Hungarian throne. In this way, Bihac was drawn into dynastic struggles that had been going on in Slavonia and Hungary for a long time. After 1405 Bihac was ruled by supporters of the Hungarian-Croatian king Sigismund, who visited Bihac on his way to Dalmatia in 1412. In 1434, King Sigismund first pledged the city and then donated it to the Croatian noble family of Frankopan, whose rule remained until the beginning of the 16th century. At the beginning of the 16th century, this part of the Punic region was under the rule of the Croatian Ban. Of those who stayed in Bihac with his military crew for a long period of time was Ivanis Korvin. With the election of Ferdinand of the Habsburgs as king of Croatia in 1527, Bihac again came under royal rule as "regia civitas". Although the King's governor, Nikola Jurisic, granted the city privileges, he placed the captain in his fort. Thus, the town of Bihac was under the jurisdiction of the ban, while the Bihac captain commanded the crew at Ripč. In the mid-16th century, the Bihać captaincy, one of the four Croatian captaincy offices, included cities: Bihac, Ripac, Sokolac, Dreznik, Tržac, Slunj, Cetina, Izacic, Toplic Turanj, Brekovica, Ostrozac, Vrnograc, Pern, Stijena, Cazin, Bužim and some more places. This is the period when Bihac is in the throes of the Ottoman Empire. Thus, the town of Bihac was under the jurisdiction of the ban, while the Bihac captain commanded the crew at Ripč. In the mid-16th century, the Bihać captaincy, one of the four Croatian captaincy offices, included cities: Bihac, Ripac, Sokolac, Dreznik, Tržac, Slunj, Cetina, Izacic, Toplica Turanj, Brekovica, Ostrozac, Vrnograc, Pern, Stijena, Cazin, Buzim and some more places. This is the period when Bihac is in the throes of the Ottoman Empire. Thus, the town of Bihac was under the jurisdiction of the ban, while the Bihac captain commanded the crew at Ripč. In the mid-16th century, the Bihać captaincy, one of the four Croatian captaincy offices, included cities: Bihac, Ripac, Sokolac, Dreznik, Tržac, Slunj, Cetina, Izacic, Toplica Turanj, Brekovica, Ostrozac, Vrnograc, Pern, Stijena, Cazin, Buzim and some more places. This is the period when Bihac is in the throes of the Ottoman Empire.

For over a hundred years, the defenders of Bihac resisted the Ottoman attacks, and in 1592 their defense was broken and Bihac conquered. By occupying Bihać, the Bihać Sandžak was established in the area between the lower reaches of the Una, Kupa and Korana rivers. The most important places in Sandžak were: Bužim, Cazin, Kamengrad, Krupa, Ostrožac and Ripač. The formed Bihać Sandžak became part of the Bosnian Eyalet (Pashaluk). During this period, Bihac became one of the most important strongholds in the westernmost province of the Ottoman Empire, from which further attacks and breakthroughs to the west were planned. During the first half of the 17th century, the fortress of Bihać was rebuilt several times. However, in 1749, in a large fire, Bihac burned down almost entirely. This was followed by repairs to the city in 1749, 1754 and 1763 when Fadil Pasha made one tower, and shortly before him Pasha Muhsinović gave him the opportunity to build one tabiy (fortification, rampart). At the end of the 17th century, the Austrian army besieged Bihac on two occasions (1689 and 1698), but without success. In the later period the fortress of Bihac was no longer fortified as before. The city was encircled by double walls, the height of the outer one being 4 m, and the inner 7.5 ms four towers: Dundzer, Zablja, Kapetanova and Kanli tower and nine tabia. Traffic across the Una River was going over a wooden bridge to the vault. The fort had about 1000 inhabitants, of which about 350 consisted of soldiers. In this period, Bihac had five suburbs with a population of about 4,000. Severe economic and social conditions also led to the regional uprising, which would end with the collapse in early 1851.

In 1865, Bihac became the seat of the Bihać Sandžak, which consisted of the following casas: Bihac, Ključ, Kostajnica, Krupa, Ostrozac (with headquarters in Cazin), Petrovac, Prijedor and Stari Majdan. During this period, Konak was built in 1860, one of the most beautiful buildings in Bihać, and in 1867 Bihać received mail and a telegraph. By the Congress of Berlin in 1878, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and thus Bihac, came under the rule of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Ten years later, the walls of the old city of Bihać are being demolished and new streets are being built on their foundations. After that, a park was built and a canal was built near Una. City gates open, so Croats and Serbs from neighboring Lika settle in Bihac, who were mostly craftsmen, traders and caterers. Later, Jews came to Bihac. They gradually move from Sarajevo through Travnik, Bosanski Petrovac to Bihać where they mainly trade. In 1881, a primary school (municipal school) was opened in Bihać, and in 1885 a three-year trade school began to operate, which would operate until 1913. During this period, another elementary school was operating in Bihać. a rug in which Arabic and Turkish are compulsory. By the dedication of the nuns of the Order of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ in their Bihac monastery, St. Joseph ("Kloster") started a public school with four grades in 1894, followed by an entertainment center and boarding school for children. Later, the nuns also started the work of a more girls' school. The school, led by the nuns of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ in Bihac, successfully operated until 1945 when it was closed by the communist authorities. The small gymnasium in Bihac begins in 1911, and by 1915 it had grown into a High School. There was a fruit school at the Bihać nursery. At the end of the 19th century, several religious buildings were built in Bihać. In 1885, the construction of St. Paul's Catholic Church began. Ante Padovansky downtown. Construction of the church was completed in 1894. With the Allied bombing of Bihac in 1944, this church was demolished. Only the bell tower remained. Near the Catholic Church, in 1894, the foundation stone was laid for the construction of the Holy Trinity Orthodox Church, which was completed in 1898. The church was demolished in 1941 by order of the Ustasha authorities led by the great mayor Ljubomir Kvaternik. In 1892, in addition to the already existing Mehmed-pasha Biscevic madrasas (built in 1841) and the madrasas built by the Biscans in 1866, in Bihac, Across the Fethiye Mosque, a third madrasa was built in the city center, which is said to have been one of the most beautiful buildings in Bihać. The madrasa was destroyed during the bombing of Bihac in World War II. At the end of the 19th century on the site between the church of st. Ante and Turbet was built a tomb in which were laid the remains of Croatian nobles who were buried in the church of St. Ante, later the mosque of Fethiye.

In the period from 1918 to 1941, Bihac was an integral part of the Kingdom of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, that is, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. It was first the center of the district, and since 1929 it has become the center of the district in Vrbas Banovo. The completion of the Bosanski Novi - Bihać railway line, 17.7.1924, should be singled out from infrastructure projects from this time. In 1936, the French company "Batinjol" began to build the Una railway. Among the cultural and educational societies in Bihac were active: "Gajret", "Enlightenment", "Krajišnik", "Narodna poddanica", "Zora" and others. The greatest contribution to the opening of the museum in Bihac in the period 1933-1941. gave dr. Stanko Sielski, then head of the Bihac Health Center. Dr. Sielski independently collects archeological objects and arranges a lapidarium located between the canal and the post office building in the center of Bihać. In 1937. Bihac gets the first organized football club "Jedinstvo", which until today is the bearer and symbol of the long sports tradition of the city on the banks of the river Una. At the beginning of World War II, Bihac became part of the newly formed Independent State of Croatia. It becomes the seat of the large parish of Krbava and Psat. German units enter Bihac 13.4. 1941, followed by 17.4.1941. and Italian. Since the first days of the occupation, a national liberation movement has been actively developing in the area of ​​Bihac and its surroundings. Successful military actions by partisan units from 2 to 4.11. 1942 resulted in the temporary occupation of Bihac. Thus formed a free territory known as the "Bihac Republic". At the beginning of World War II, Bihac became part of the newly formed Independent State of Croatia. It becomes the seat of the large parish of Krbava and Psat. German units enter Bihac 13.4. 1941, followed by 17.4.1941. and Italian. Since the first days of the occupation, a national liberation movement has been actively developing in the area of ​​Bihac and its surroundings. Successful military actions by partisan units from 2 to 4.11. 1942 resulted in the temporary occupation of Bihac. Thus formed a free territory known as the "Bihac Republic". At the beginning of World War II, Bihac became part of the newly formed Independent State of Croatia. It becomes the seat of the large parish of Krbava and Psat. German units enter Bihac 13.4. 1941, followed by 17.4.1941. and Italian. Since the first days of the occupation, a national liberation movement has been actively developing in the area of ​​Bihac and its surroundings. Successful military actions by partisan units from 2 to 4.11. 1942 resulted in the temporary occupation of Bihac. Thus formed a free territory known as the "Bihac Republic". Successful military actions by partisan units from 2 to 4.11. 1942 resulted in the temporary occupation of Bihac. Thus formed a free territory known as the "Bihac Republic". Successful military actions by partisan units from 2 to 4.11. 1942 resulted in the temporary occupation of Bihac. Thus formed a free territory known as the "Bihac Republic".

During the Second World War and the National Liberation War, Bihac became a place where many decisions were made that were important for the final liberation of Yugoslavia. Thus, the first session of the AVNOJ was held in Bihać on 26 and 27 November 1942, which became the national and general political representation of the NOP. German forces again on 29.1.1943. occupied Bihac. Under German occupation, Bihac remained until March 28, 1945, when he was released. In the period 1945-1992. Bihac, within the FR of Bosnia and Herzegovina, belongs to the SFRY and becomes an important economic, cultural and administrative center of this part of the Bosnian Krajina, and especially of the then Bihać district. During the 1992-1995 aggression against Bosnia and Herzegovina. year, Bihać together with the whole area of ​​Bihać district is 1201 days in complete lockdown and isolation. Although exposed to the daily shelling and casualties of the civilian population, thanks to units of the Fifth Corps of the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Croatian Defense Council of the Bihac Region, and the MUP, Bihac was defended. After the war, with the 1995 Dayton Peace Agreement and the new administrative and political structure of BiH, Bihac became the seat of the Una-Sana Canton.